Category Archives: Uncategorized

Quest Group Project

We are experimenting with creating a large game as a group project. This was started on the forum, and has now moved to Github, where the basic ideas are being thrashed out.

The basic idea is that the player starts at a hub location, and can travel from there to numerous dimensions, with each author creating their own dimension (or two?). We have a framework to handle this, which allows each author to work on their game starting from a simple template, and when we are ready to go live, each game will be sent in, converted to a library and added to the master version. This means people can join the project at any time (even after it has been released potentially), and it can keep going if one person drops out – and in fact it would be quite easy to convert your game to a standalone game, if the whole thing ends up going nowhere.

The project wiki is here:
https://github.com/rheadkid/Quest-Group_Project/wiki

And there is a forum thread here:
http://textadventures.co.uk/forum/design/topic/3usjedp8bkcgxdbfsd-jza/were-starting-up-a-group-project-who-wants-to-collaborate-the-pixie-has-a-temp

It looks like it will be a science-fiction/fantasy romp across time and space in a classic, old school style. If you want to get involved and to have a say in how the game will develop, now is the time to join, before it all gets set in stone!

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Quest 5.7

At long last, Quest 5.7 is officially out. It has been on the web server for a couple of days, and beta-testers have had access to the desktop version for some time, but as of now it is officially here!

Alex has been developing Quest since 1998, and this is the first release since he handed over the reins, so firstly I want to wish Alex well, and to thank him for bringing Quest to this point. I would also like to thank him for help over the last few months with getting Quest 5.7 ready.

I would also like to thank Luis for his work on the server; I know this has been a learning experience for him, as it has me, and I appreciate the effort.

I have tried to achieve a number of objectives in this version, and as a result there are a lot of difference. That said, it is just Quest, so all existing games should run fine, and any game you are currently creating can be opened in the new version – you will just find there are new options available.

One thing I wanted to do is make it easier to customise the user interface. Up to now that has required some technical expertise, and for users on the web version has been very limited. Now there are numerous extra options in the GUI, new functions (JS.setCss, JS.setCommands, JS.setCustomStatus and JS.setPanes) for the more adventurous, and for the expert the inituserinterface script can be accessed by both web and desktop users

There is now a comprehensive system for handling clothing. Money has been implemented similar to health and score, but with options for how to display it. Objects can be given a price, facilitating an economy in games. Text can be added to an exit; this will get printed when the exit is used, so now you can easily describe the player’s trip from one location to another.

Many more changes are described here:

http://docs.textadventures.co.uk/quest/quest5_7.html

If you have looked at the Quest documentation recently, you may have noticed changed there too. This is a work in progress, driven in part by the types of questions people ask on the forum. There is a huge amount you can do with Quest, which is one of its great strengths, but does mean a huge amount of documentation to cover it, and that then leads to issues with how to find it! Hopefully we are getting there.

 

The Pixie

Squiffy 5 – an improved editing experience

Squiffy 5 is now available – you can use it in your web browser, or download it for Windows, OS X and Linux.

This release makes various enhancements to the Squiffy Editor. The number one request by far has been to add an option to change the font size – so that is now done!

There’s also improved syntax highlighting. Section and passage headers are now highlighted, and in-line JavaScript code gets its own highlighting.

It’s now easier to work on larger games. You can collapse sections and passages, so it’s easier to focus on just the one you’re currently editing. The section and passage lists at the top of the screen are now searchable.

You’ll find shortcuts to collapse and uncollapse all sections and passages on the new Tools tab. This also features new shortcut buttons allowing you to easily add new sections and passages. Let’s say you’ve written a paragraph of text and want to add a link to it. Now you can simply select the text you want to link, hit “Add section” or “Add passage”, and a new section or passage of that name will be created, with the text linked to it.

Squiffy 5

Try it out… Squiffy works in your web browser without downloading anything, or you can download versions for Windows, OS X and Linux.

Squiffy is free and open source, and you can find both the compiler and editor on GitHub:

Open-sourcing “Moquette”

A year ago, I released my first work of interactive fiction “Moquette” into the IFComp.

Today, I’m releasing the source code for it: https://github.com/alexwarren/moquette

It might be useful if you’re interested in implementing similar text effects in your own Quest game – if so, this blog post may also help.

Or who knows, maybe you’d like to adapt it – fix up the writing, change the ending, whatever… you can now fork it and do what you like with it.

The commit history goes all the way back to when it was a very primitive London Underground simulator, so you can see how it evolved over time. You can see the bursts of activity on GitHub’s commit graphs, which give some indication of the ebbs and flows of my energy for writing.

I haven’t had so much energy for writing for the last year, though I’m kicking around ideas again. Who knows where they will end up. Perhaps we haven’t yet heard the last of Private Rod…

Starting a new chapter

I’ve been building Quest and working on textadventures.co.uk full-time for a couple of years now, on and off. Despite my best efforts to turn this into my living, I can no longer continue to work on this basis. As of January, I’ll be moving on to work on something else, with interactive fiction becoming a side project once again.

We applied to Emerge, a new startup accelerator focusing on education, with our aim of building up ActiveLit. I’m told about 80 companies applied, and we were one of the 20 selected for interview.

Unfortunately we are not one of the 7 or 8 that have been selected to join the programme.

We would like to thank you for taking the time to apply to and interview for Emerge Education ’14.

Places are limited and the applications were excellent. It was difficult to select participants from such a strong group. Unfortunately on this occasion, we are not in a position to offer you a place in Emerge Education ’14. We hope you will apply to our future programs.

We include below a brief summary of how we arrived at this decision and hope this is helpful to you:

  • Your product was more developed and had more traction than that of any other applicant to Emerge Education and we were impressed by the user demand it has received;
  • The selection committee’s main concern was a lack of clarity around whether your team had the strategic intent to take ActiveLit from an (already) successful product to a high-growth business;
  • In addition, applicants that did better in the selection process tended to have more business experience as part of the co-founding team.

I find it difficult to understand the logic here, and in fact this email makes less sense every time I re-read it. The highest traction product of all applicants, but a question mark over our “strategic intent”?

Whatever. You can’t expect too much from rejection emails. Any “reasons” given are always post-hoc justifications of the decision made. I expect the most typical would be “your product is not sufficiently developed”, so at least it’s novel to be turned down because our product is too developed.

It would only require one reason to say yes – “we think there’s a good chance of making money if we invest in you”. At least in this way it’s a more straightforward and honest process than awarding grants – it’s refreshingly simple compared to working out why, say, a government body won’t award funding. Any rejection from an accelerator is fundamentally because they couldn’t find this reason to say “yes”, rather than any reasons that may be given for saying “no”.

This is the feedback we’ve been waiting for, then – the simple yes/no answer to the question “Can we convince people that know about money and business and stuff that what we’ve been working on is viable?”

And the results are in, and the answer, at least from Emerge (and also Wayra), is “no”. And that’s fine.

They say that it takes grit to succeed, but what if you never give up on an idea that is fundamentally never going to work? Maybe it simply makes more sense for Quest, textadventures.co.uk and ActiveLit to be run as side projects. I’ve sunk a lot of time into these now – 2 years of full-time effort. I’d be much richer now if I hadn’t done this.

Of course, I’d be unhappy. I’m really pleased with what I’ve achieved. I used to sit at work, seething in frustration, because there were things I wanted to do with interactive fiction that I didn’t get time for. That’s changed now – I’ve built a lot of software, explored a lot of angles and spoken to a lot of people, trying to work out how an interactive fiction business might succeed.

And what I’ve discovered is, I can’t make it work. Not right now anyway. Maybe it just needs to live and grow organically for a while. Maybe something external will change, as more and more people discover interactive fiction, or as more teachers use Quest and text adventures in the classroom. I’ve got nothing left to “push” from my side, and I’ve run out of money anyway.

And even if nothing external changes, and it never grows beyond what it currently is, it will still have been worthwhile. I don’t regret anything. I’ve built what I wanted to build. I’ve scratched the itch. I’ve created software that is being used by all kinds of people for all kinds of things. Children are learning programming, being engaged with reading and writing. More and more people are playing and creating games on the site. I’ve met some great, interesting people. It’s been a lot of fun. It’s been totally worth it.

But I can’t do this for a living, so it will have to become my hobby again. There are plenty of other things I can do – there are loads of opportunities for software developers at the moment, and there are some great companies out there doing interesting things which I can contribute to. It’s an exciting time, and I’ve now got some great experience that will hopefully prove useful in whatever I move onto next.