Category Archives: Quest

Meet the new textadventures.co.uk team

I announced last month that I was handing over textadventures.co.uk and Quest. Many thanks to everybody who got in touch to volunteer to help. I was really pleased that so many people want to see these projects continue into the future. I am now happy to announce that we have a new team in place!

Luis Felipe Morales will be taking over the textadventures.co.uk and ActiveLit websites, and also Squiffy. A programmer since the 1980s, Luis has been involved with the Spanish interactive fiction community since he was young. He has maintained and created several internet portals and now works as a freelancer.

Jay Nabonne and Andy a.k.a The Pixie will be taking over development of Quest. Both have been very active members of the forums for a long time. Jay is a lifelong programmer and game player who is interested in not only creating games but helping others to do the same. A California native, he now lives with his wife in the UK. Andy has been playing and creating text adventure games since the Eighties, has been using Quest for over five years and has written various guides and libraries for the system.

Greg Fenton and Nathan Clive Gerard will each be running servers for Quest’s WebPlayer and WebEditor. Greg is a developer who wrote his first text adventure in dBase III on an IBM PC back in the very late 1980s shortly after leaving high school. Nathan is a regular player of text adventures from the UK (currently living in the USA), who spends his days setting up and looking after web servers in the cloud.

I’ll be working with each of them over the coming months to ensure a smooth transition. Please welcome them aboard!

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Developers needed for textadventures.co.uk and Quest

This is a follow up to Looking for a new owner for textadventures.co.uk and Quest.

Thanks to all of you who have got in touch so far. A lot of people have asked about what would be involved in taking over and running textadventures.co.uk and/or Quest, so this post is to go into a bit more detail about how things are set up and how the work might be split up across different people.

For a smooth transition, I need to find people to fill these four roles:

  • One or more .NET web developers for textadventures.co.uk and/or ActiveLit, familiar with Azure and ASP.NET MVC and with front-end development using JavaScript and Bootstrap.
  • One or more JavaScript developers for Quest 6, Squiffy and/or QuestKit. Ideally familiar with back-end and front-end web development, and desktop development using Electron.
  • One or more .NET developers familiar with both desktop and web development for Quest 5. Ideally familiar with both C# and VB.NET.
  • A server admin to keep the current browser version of Quest alive (both the Player and the Editor). Needs to know how to run a Windows server. This is currently running on a VPS at OVH. (This is just for the online player and editor – running textadventures.co.uk itself will require a developer familiar with Azure. Eventually if both the Quest Player and Editor are rewritten to use JavaScript, the server admin role becomes redundant).

Of course any of these roles can be combined – after all, they’ve all been done by me up until now.

textadventures.co.uk and ActiveLit sites

textadventures.co.uk and ActiveLit run on the Azure App Service (formerly known as Azure Websites). Data is stored in Azure SQL and in Azure blob and table storage.

The web-accessible blobs (for game downloads, cover art etc.) are behind a Cloudflare CDN.

The code uses C# and ASP.NET MVC. The front-end uses Bootstrap, JQuery and a little bit of React.

ActiveLit runs alongside textadventures.co.uk on the same Azure infrastructure and talks to the same database.

Quest 5 & 6

There are two parts to Quest – the Player and the Editor. There are also two ways of using Quest – via the web, and via a downloadable Windows desktop application.

The current version is Quest 5, and I also made a start on Quest 6 which is architected quite differently. The new version rewrites the Player back-end to use JavaScript, which means the web version requires no server component (making it much faster, infinitely scalable, distributable on any website, and an end to time-outs while playing), and the desktop version will be cross-platform for the first time (packaged using Electron for Windows, Mac and Linux).

To take on Quest 6, I’m looking for a developer who has experience using the modern JavaScript ecosystem (npm, TypeScript, gulp, webpack and all of that kind of thing). I will work with this person to help get Quest 6 shipped. (It doesn’t make sense for me to continue working on this project without somebody to hand it over to, because it will of course need to be maintained after it is shipped). Quest 6 lives in the v6 branch on GitHub.

After Quest 6 is shipped, rewriting the Editor to use JavaScript would also be really useful. That would be a project for the new Quest 6 maintainer, or maybe even someone else. If Quest could be taken to the point where both the Player and the Editor were shipping as 100% JavaScript applications, that would be a massive simplification of the Quest architecture.

Quest’s long-term future lies with Quest 6, but it would be good if we can find somebody to maintain Quest 5 for the time being, not least because even if/when Quest 6 ships, it will still be using the same .NET-based Editor that Quest 5 uses.

I’ve updated the Developers documentation page on the Quest docs site to describe how the various projects that make up Quest 5 together. It is not an easy thing to pick up – there’s a lot of code there, and a mixture of languages and technologies reflecting my changing tastes and experience over time. It’s stable though, and it shouldn’t require big changes because if the Player and Editor both get rewritten using JavaScript then all of it will become obsolete.

Proposals

If you’re interested in taking on one or more of these roles, please email me at alex@textadventures.co.uk.

To reiterate, I am not looking for money. I want to hand these over to somebody (or a group of people) with a passion for IF and a vision for where these products could go in the future. That vision doesn’t necessarily have to agree with my vision (that’s what stepping back is about) – this is a massive opportunity for somebody to take over running a popular website and IF development system. textadventures.co.uk is the place people come when they search for text adventures on the web, so it’s a big gateway to the world of interactive fiction. Taking on the website doesn’t have to be about taking on Quest.

I’ve only got Alexa rankings to prove it (so take them with a pinch of salt) but the site appears to be bigger than other IF sites like IFDB, intfiction.org and Choice of Games. It’s how a lot of people start out making text adventures – in fact, it’s introduced a lot of people to programming in the first place. It’s used by schools to get children into coding and creative writing.

Thanks again for responses so far. If you can’t help out yourself, please help spread the word to somebody who might be able to take this on and ensure it has a future.

Looking for a new owner for textadventures.co.uk and Quest

I have been developing Quest and textadventures.co.uk for a long time. It started off as a summer coding project when I was a teenager and wanted to send stupid text adventure games to a friend. Over the last couple of decades it has turned into something far bigger than I could have imagined.

It has alternated between hobby and full-time job, and tinkering with it all these years has taught me huge amounts about writing software, helping turn me into the developer that I am today.

I’m proud of what I’ve built – various open source projects that have enabled hundreds of thousands of people to build games for the first time, and a website that has become the top hit on Google for “text adventures” and attracts 3,500 users per day, a number which continues to increase.

The software and community around it are in great shape, and I think they have a great future. But the time has come for somebody else to take charge – I want to focus my energy on new projects, and hand over what I’ve built to somebody else who has the passion to drive things forward.

I am looking for people interested in taking this on. There are quite a lot of different bits, and these wouldn’t all necessarily need to go to the same person or company – things could be split up if that looks like the best option. I am open to all suggestions and proposals – my main concern above all else is finding the best home (or homes) for the long-term future for these projects. I am not looking for money and I’m happy to do everything I can to ensure a smooth handover.

If you’re interested, please email me at alex@textadventures.co.uk.

What if new owners can’t be found?

I really hope that people from the interactive fiction community will want to see Quest and textadventures.co.uk continue, so if you can possibly help then please get in touch. Do you want to keep textadventures.co.uk alive for the community that loves it? Could you take it forward to bigger and better things?

If no suitable new owners come forward by 28th February 2017, then sadly I will have to start the process of shutting down the website and forums. Initially they will become read-only, and I will look to export the data elsewhere (the IF Archive or the Internet Archive) before closing the sites completely.

Quest and Squiffy will remain accessible on GitHub but there will be no further updates. The software will still be able to be downloaded for offline use, but the online web-based versions would no longer be available. The GitHub repositories themselves would probably be transferred to the IFTF.

The different bits

  • Quest
  • Squiffy
  • QuestKit
  • textadventures.co.uk:
    • The site itself, where people can upload games (not just Quest and Squiffy games, but Inklewriter, Twine and Inform games too) and post reviews and comments
    • The forums
    • Online player and editor for Quest games
    • Online editor for Squiffy
  • ActiveLit
  • Social media accounts:
  • Various domain names:
    • textadventures.co.uk
    • textadventures.uk
    • textadventures.co
    • textadventures.net
    • textadventur.es
    • textadventure.co.uk
    • activelit.com
    • activelit.co.uk

Some numbers

textadventures.co.uk according to Google Analytics:

  • ~3,500 unique visitors/day
  • 83,986 unique visitors in November 2016 (a 14% increase on November 2015)
  • 428,119 page views in November 2016 (18% increase on November 2015)
  • Average session duration 03m 41s
  • 66% of sessions are from new users, 34% returning

Users:

  • 161,203 registered users (115,038 with confirmed email addresses)
  • In November 2016, new sign-ups from 4,746 users (3,190 with confirmed email addresses)

Games:

  • 13,582 games (8,216 are public) of which:
    • Quest games: 9,892
    • HTML (Twine, Squiffy etc.) and Inform games: 1,621
    • Inklewriter games: 1,321
    • External links (game listings from IFDB, Choice of Games etc): 757
  • In November 2016, 394 new games (136 are public)
  • 8,317 reviews and 13,414 comments
  • In November 2016, 197 new reviews and 336 new comments
  • 94,575 games started in Quest’s online editor

Social Media:

  • @TextAdv on Twitter: 921 followers
  • textadventures on Facebook: 1076 likes

Income and Expenses:

AdSense earns about £50/month for the limited advertising which is currently on the site.

The main costs are for Azure at ~£70/month, and the VPS (hosted by OVH) which runs the Quest online player and editor at £13.59/month ex VAT.

(On Azure, I’ve been getting a £65/month free credit, so the actual amount billed averages only about £5. This means the total cost for running the site has been about £20/month, which has been entirely offset from the Adsense income.)

Quest 5.5.1

Quest 5.5.1 is now available.

  • Containers can now be locked using multiple keys (contributed by Pertex)
  • Gamebooks can now have a script that runs for every page (contributed by Pertex)
  • New Grid_DrawImage function to draw an image on the custom drawing grid
  • New Setup uses InnoSetup instead of InstallShield, and has a smaller file size

Various bugs have been fixed by me and Pertex. In particular, there were a couple of bugs with timers that meant they used to work unreliably, particularly when playing a game on the web. These have now been resolved, so if you were avoiding using timers, please try them again!

This release is now live for the web version of Quest, and you can also download the Windows version.

Please log any bugs you find on GitHub.

Quest is now on GitHub

Ever since Quest was made open source back in 2010, we’ve been using CodePlex, which is Microsoft’s open source project hosting site.

Now in 2014, even Microsoft isn’t using CodePlex any more – all their open source ASP.NET is on GitHub, for example.

So CodePlex has been feeling a bit dead, but even worse, it’s been a bit buggy over the last few months – frequently giving me authorisation errors when pushing to the Mercurial repository.

I’d stuck with CodePlex and Mercurial for a while because Git tooling on Windows was always kind of horrible. Fortunately, that changed when GitHub launched GitHub for Windows, which finally makes it easy for just about anybody to use Git.

So I’ve now migrated Quest over, and the source code now officially lives on GitHub at https://github.com/textadventures/quest.

All issues from the CodePlex Issue Tracker have been migrated too. Please log all bug reports at GitHub from now on.

Finally, nobody had ever heard of the Ms-PL which Quest was previously licensed under. I kept having to say it was “just like the MIT licence”. So I’ve updated that too, and Quest is now officially licensed using the MIT licence. Nothing has really changed – you can still do pretty much what you want with the Quest code, including using it within closed-source projects – but hopefully it’s just a bit clearer now.

How am I doing? The Quest and textadventures.co.uk Annual Review 2013/14

I’ve done an “annual review” at around this time of year for the last few years, so it feels like a good idea to do it again, one last time. For reference:

This is the last time I’ll do an annual review because I am no longer working on Quest and textadventures.co.uk full-time. The good news is I’ve just started an absolutely awesome job at Stack Exchange, and for pretty much the first time ever I am thoroughly enjoying being employed.

Some stats

textadventures.co.uk has grown quite a lot over the last year:

  • It currently averages around 1500 unique visitors per day, up from about 800 a year ago.
  • Over the last week, there were on average 2150 game sessions per day, which is up from 480 per day. (That figure was the average over 2012/13, so is not exactly equivalent – the site grew over 2012/13 too, so the daily average by the end of 2012/13 would probably have been a bit higher).
  • There are currently 3693 games listed on the site, up from 980. Of these, 2536 are publicly available (the rest are private “unlisted” games only available to those who have been given the link).
  • Of the games on the site, 2752 are Quest games, of which 1671 are public. So, there are 941 non-Quest games – which is up from zero a year ago, as during this year support was added for all kinds of web-playable text games. 503 of these non-Quest games have been imported from IFDB (more will be added soon).
  • 24,548 games have now been created using the web version of the Quest editor since it was launched, up from 7300 last year. 1766 of these have been published, up from 331.
  • Of the 1751 Quest games added since 1st April 2013, 1334 were created with the web version of Quest – 76%. Last year it was more like 50%.

Some things that happened since the previous annual review

May 2013: Released Filbert and the Broccoli Escape – an interactive children’s book for iPad, and the beta of ActiveLit. I also spoke a bit about text adventures at GameCamp.

June 2013: Wrote up some thoughts from the Futurebook Innovation Workshop, and started accepting games built with Twine, Undum, Parchment etc.

July 2013: The first QuestComp competition finished. Open-sourced QuestJS, the Quest-to-JavaScript converter. Wrote up some initial thoughts about Quest 6, although my thinking has changed somewhat since then – carry on reading this post for my current thoughts.

August 2013: Added more games to the site by accepting external listings for web-playable text games.

September 2013: Wrote up some notes from the Publish 2013 conference. The IFComp games were released, including my very own first work of interactive fiction – a story set on the London Underground called Moquette.

October 2013: Enrolled on the 3-month Story Innovation Programme, experimenting with stories and technology with a whole bunch of interesting people.

November 2013: The IFComp results were in, and I wrote a two-part analysis of Moquette – part 1 and part 2. I also wrote a three-part series of blog posts looking back at 15 years of Quest – part 1, part 2, part 3. Meanwhile, as part of the Story Innovation Programme, I started work on an experimental interactive fiction project as part of a brief we had been given by book publisher 4th Estate, to come up with something to promote the forthcoming “Annihilation” by Jeff VanderMeer.

December 2013: After failing to get funding to continue with Quest and textadventures.co.uk full-time, it was time to start thinking about moving on. I didn’t let the knock-back stop me from released Quest 5.5 Beta though. The Story Innovation Programme came to an end, and we demonstrated our prototype to 4th Estate, who liked it enough to want to see it turned into an actual thing.

January 2014: Mostly job-hunting, really.

February 2014: After finally getting the go-ahead from 4th Estate, I spent most of the month working with Caroline Moran, Simon Mercer, Martha Henson and Sam Howey-Nunn to build our interactive experience Join The Southern Reach, which launched at the end of the month.

March: Released Quest 5.5 and started my new job.

Good, but not good enough

I think there are a lot of positive aspects to what’s happened over the last year, but ultimately none of the major projects were as successful as I’d hoped.

  • ActiveLit, the site I set up for schools using Quest in the classroom, has got off to a fairly slow start. It is getting signups, and there are other groups (presumably schools) which I can detect using the main site, but it seems like the energy has waned somehow – I used to see blog posts and tweets from teachers getting excited about the potential for text games in the classroom, but I don’t see this very often now. I haven’t been invited to an educational conference or asked to run a workshop for a while now either.
  • Moquette did OK in the IFComp – not terribly, which was a relief for my first game, but it hardly set the world alight. I still judge this a successful project though – it was my favourite thing I worked on all year and certainly the most challenging. It taught me a lot about writing interactive fiction, and I got to see Quest in a whole new light. It’s good to remember the importance of “eating your own dogfood“.
  • Join The Southern Reach is pretty good, I think, but it has attracted very few users. I had big hopes for this as it’s something I’ve wanted to do for a long time – a project with a traditional publisher. I got to focus on the coding, leaving other people to worry about the actual writing, the marketing, and so on. It got on to BoingBoing, yet it has had fewer players than Moquette. It shows that even if a project is backed by a publisher and an author with an existing fan base, that’s not enough.
  • I suppose “seeking money” was the other major project of the year. We came tantalisingly close with Emerge, but not close enough.

Where next?

What next for Quest and textadventures.co.uk, then? They are back to being spare-time projects, which is a relief in many ways as I no longer need to worry about how on earth I might make money from them – giving me a lot more freedom to just pursue the aspects I’m interested in.

textadventures.co.uk is growing, getting more visitors and receiving more submissions. Managing this is an interesting challenge. How should we highlight and encourage good games, how can we help people to post useful reviews and comments?

Quest itself seems less interesting to me. The textadventures.co.uk site is now bigger than Quest, as it now accepts submissions from all web-playable systems. And it feels to me like I don’t have much more to contribute to Quest itself – I’ve pretty much reached the end of my mental list of things I’d like to do with it. Significantly, in writing Moquette I came to the realisation that Quest isn’t actually working for me as an author. It’s too big and complicated, it tries to do too much, and the HTML/JavaScript aspects of it are not as flexible as I’d hoped. (I had to do a lot of hacking around to make Moquette, which is largely why the 5.5 release of Quest exists).

It was with this in mind that I started work on Squiffy, which is pretty much the system that would have needed to exist for me to have been able to write Moquette as simply as possible. I haven’t really announced it much yet, and there’s still some way to go before it’s really usable.

I will continue to accept any pull requests that are sent my way for Quest, but I can’t see myself doing anything too major on it in the future.

The wider world of interactive fiction continues to grow and change. Inkle seem to be doing very well, people are still making stuff in Twine, the IFComp is changing, there are new meetups like the Oxford and London Interactive Fiction Group. This is all very encouraging, but maybe over the last year I’m just not seeing the acceleration of change that I was expecting. I used to be convinced that interactive fiction could grow to become much more mainstream than it currently is, but now I’m not so sure at all.

So it feels like the right time for me to be putting interactive fiction projects back into the time-slot marked “hobbies”.

Quest 5.5 is now available

Quest 5.5 is now out of beta:

For details on what’s new in Quest 5.5, see the beta announcement blog post.

Changes since the beta:

  • Mauricio Díaz García updated the Spanish translation, and added a new editor translation – so the editor now is mostly displayed in Spanish when editing a Spanish game.
  • Pertex fixed a few bugs and did some more work on allowing the Editor to be translated.

Thanks once again to everybody who has contributed to this release: Pertex, Jay Nabonne, The Pixie, Guillaume Poulain, Katzy and Mauricio Díaz García, and also to Phillip Zolla for sponsoring the new drawing features in this release.

Quest 5.5 Beta is now available

The Windows desktop version of Quest 5.5 Beta is now available for download.

This is a relatively small update, with a focus on refining the player interface, and a few other tweaks and enhancements here and there.

Improving the player interface

This version features some enhancements to make it easier to create games that look a little more elegant. The location bar and screen border can be toggled off, and you can set a custom display width and padding. There are new display themes, so you can easily change from the Quest Standard theme:

Quest Standard Theme

to the simpler “Novella” theme:

Quest Novella Theme

And there are a few more fun bonus themes too.

In gamebook mode, the new default is to not to clear the previous page when clicking a link – instead, new text is added to the bottom. (The option to have the screen clear between pages is still available).

Drawing

Support has been added for drawing SVG graphics in the custom drawing layer. There are new functions for drawing arrows and arbitrary many-sided shapes. The automatically generated grid map now works when multiple player POV objects are used.

Tweaks

Various tweaks have been submitted by Quest users:

  • Pertex added more gamebook counter functions, as well as contributing some bug fixes.
  • Jay Nabonne has contributed a tweak to the “invoke” script command.
  • The Pixie has added a “select” command to the text processor, and updated the text processor’s “{if}” to allow not-equals.

Translations

  • Pertex has started work on allowing the Editor to be translated.
  • Guillaume Poulain has contributed an updated French translation.
  • Katzy submitted corrections for Dutch.

Other changes

  • The “return” statement now immediately exits the function.
  • The “Pause” request is no longer supported for games written for Quest 5.5 or later.
  • You can now create a blank JavaScript file straight from the editor.
  • There is a new “Features” tab for both the game and objects, making it easier to toggle Quest features on and off, so you only see the editor tabs you care about.

Thanks to everybody who contributed towards this release – please download it now and submit any bug reports to the issue tracker.

15 years of Quest, part 3: 2000-2004 – Experimenting with Multi-Player

This is part 3 of a look back at 15 years of Quest. Here are links to the previous posts: part 1, part 2.

The first alpha build Quest 3.0 was released in March 2000, and fixed one of the weird design flaws of previous versions by unifying “items” and “objects”. Objects now had to have unique names, but they could have aliases, which would be displayed to the player instead of the code name. This version also introduced a disambiguation menu to allow the player to distinguishing between different objects which had same the alias. This is fundamentally the same approach to object handling that Quest still uses today.

That first alpha of Quest 3.0 also added timers. The second alpha in July 2000 added support for a truly experimental feature that never quite took off – online multi-player play. This allowed Quest to connect to a new bit of software I was working on, which started out with the name “QX3” and was later renamed “QuestNet Server”.

The idea was that the game ran entirely on the server, and players would connect to it using the Quest software. This would allow multiple players to connect to the same game world, where they would each have their own inventories and be able to interact with other players.

You can get some idea of how it worked by looking at some screenshots for the basic “Arena” demo. Multiple players would appear in the same room, and they could pick up objects, give them to each other, and even hit each other. For example, here’s what Bob might see if he joins Alex in the room:

Multi-player Quest game - 1

And here’s what Alex sees while this is happening:

Multi-player Quest game - 2

I thought this was rather nifty, myself, and although it got a reasonable amount of interest from Quest users, it ultimately failed to really get anywhere. I’ve come across a forum post from 2002 by MaDbRiT which sums it up:

Questnet is a good idea that is kind of struggling to get off the ground. There are no games because there are no players and no one wants to spend aged writing a game if there are no players. What came first, the Chicken or the Egg? The technical demands of hosting a QuestNet game are out of realistic reach of most of us too – even if I wrote a QuestNet game, I couldn’t “serve” it – I just don’t have the facilities.

In the days when most of us were still using dial-up, the idea of running a server on your home internet connection just didn’t make a whole lot of sense.

QuestNet Server would hang around for a while, never getting much use or ever seeing its full potential. I still think there’s something in the idea of multi-player interactive fiction, and maybe it’s something to revisit some day. Watch this space!

The second alpha of Quest 3.0 also got rid of the separate concept of “characters” – they were now just objects too. It added support for arrays, and arbitrary object properties allowing any kind of data to be attached to an object (although these were separate to the built-in properties or “tags”, which meant that you couldn’t easily read or update data like an object’s “look” description – this flaw was resolved when Quest was rewritten for v5.0, when all object data was finally stored as properties).

A third alpha build followed in September 2000, which added object types – allowing object properties to be inherited. This also added support for creating rooms on-the-fly via script.

In October 2000, I moved to London and started university, so progress with Quest slowed down quite a bit.

In March 2001, Quest 3.0 reached its first beta release. This added support for dynamically creating objects and exits, and added script properties (“actions”). The second beta followed in April, featuring various minor tweaks to get it closer to a releasable version. Quest 3.0 was finally released in September 2001, and QDK was updated at the same time to get a cleaner interface and to support all the new Quest features. It also gained a new script editor.

The new-look start screen allowed you to load a game file, or connect to a multi-player network game:

Quest 3.0 Start Screen

The main player interface was relatively unchanged from Quest 2.1, although you could now toggle the panes off:
Quest 3.0

QDK was still looking rather plain:QDK 3.0

The Room and Object editors were now grouped into tabs:QDK 3.0 Room Editor

QDK 3.0 Object Editor

The new Script Editor presented a plain English way of editing scripts. It’s not dissimilar to Quest 5’s script editor, although it did involve opening a pop-up window every time you wanted to edit any individual command, which some people found a bit tiring:QDK 3.0 Script Editor

A few bug-fix releases followed very shortly afterwards, and then I started working on v3.1. This added support for MOD music files – something I was into creating myself, but a feature I think was never actually used by anybody. There were various other tweaks, including improvements to the parser. Libraries gained the ability to add panes to QDK (here again is an example of a feature that was added which is now a core part of how Quest works – as of v5.0, all panes in Quest’s editor are defined by libraries). Quest 3.1 was released in June 2002.

The next update was version 3.5, released in December 2003, featuring the ability to translate the player interface (although not on a per-game basis – it was a player setting), plus support for text-to-speech and opening ZIP files. Following slightly later in January 2004 was the first non-beta release of QuestNet Server – although, as it would turn out, it would never get another significant release after that, simply keeping pace with features as they were added to the single-player version Quest.

The pace of change was clearly slowing down, as I was keeping busy with my Physics degree. It got even worse after I graduated in 2004, and started working – I didn’t really touch Quest for almost two years. But when I finally came back to it, I dived into it in a big way. More on that next time!

For a trip down memory lane, all posts from the old forums from 2000-2003 are available: Quest Forum, QuestNet Forum, Games and Chat Forum. Posts from 2003 onwards are all part of the current forums.