Monthly Archives: October 2014

Open-sourcing “Moquette”

A year ago, I released my first work of interactive fiction “Moquette” into the IFComp.

Today, I’m releasing the source code for it: https://github.com/alexwarren/moquette

It might be useful if you’re interested in implementing similar text effects in your own Quest game – if so, this blog post may also help.

Or who knows, maybe you’d like to adapt it – fix up the writing, change the ending, whatever… you can now fork it and do what you like with it.

The commit history goes all the way back to when it was a very primitive London Underground simulator, so you can see how it evolved over time. You can see the bursts of activity on GitHub’s commit graphs, which give some indication of the ebbs and flows of my energy for writing.

I haven’t had so much energy for writing for the last year, though I’m kicking around ideas again. Who knows where they will end up. Perhaps we haven’t yet heard the last of Private Rod…

Squiffy 2.0

Squiffy 2.0 is now available. Just like Apple’s “Snow Leopard” release of OS X a few years ago, this release of Squiffy boasts an amazing 0 new features.

0 new features

Why no new features? Because Squiffy releases should only do one thing at a time, and this release is all about rewriting the compiler to use Node.js instead of Python.

This does make installation simpler, as Squiffy is now an npm package. To install Squiffy, you just need to install Node.js and then run

npm install squiffy -g

That’s it!

Everything else is the same as before, with the possible exception of there being a different set of bugs now. If you spot any, please log them on GitHub.

You can find out how to use Squiffy by looking at the documentation, and the Squiffy 1.0 blog post’s overview is still up-to-date except for the reference to Python.