Monthly Archives: July 2014

Squiffy 1.0

Squiffy is a lightweight tool for writing interactive fiction. It is open source and runs on Windows, OS X and Linux. It generates static HTML, CSS and JavaScript files which you can upload anywhere.

I’ve already written one interactive fiction system, Quest – so why create another? It was while writing my first game Moquette last year that I realised I needed a simpler tool for the kind of interactive story that I was interested in writing. I wanted something that would let me sit down and “just write”, mostly getting out of my way.

So I’ve now created the tool that I wished I had back then. This version 1.0 release is intentionally very simple – it’s a command-line Python script that reads in a text file, and writes the output to the same folder. Here’s how to install Squiffy.

Game text is written using Markdown. Players click links to interact with the game. Unlike other systems, Squiffy’s equivalent of “nodes” or “pages” are split into two types:

  • Sections which move the story forward
  • Passages which provide a way to further explore or interact with the same scene

An example might help to explain the distinction between the two.

You enter the room. There's a [chair] and a [table] here.
You can go to the [[kitchen]].

[chair]:
Just a chair.

[table]:
An ordinary table.

[[kitchen]]:
You enter the kitchen...

Here, “kitchen” is a new section, whereas “chair” and “table” are links in the same section. You can click the chair, and the chair’s description appears, but the table and kitchen links remain enabled. If you click the kitchen link, the table link is now disabled, as you’ve moved to the next section.

If this sounds confusing, don’t worry – you can build you game entirely out of sections, and it will play as a traditional multiple choice game. But by including passages, you could create works that have a bit more of an exploratory feel. If Moquette were written now using Squiffy, I could use sections for each train, and passages for interacting with people in the same train carriage, for example.

Squiffy also makes it easy to use JavaScript. Any section or passage can embed JavaScript, simply by indenting code before the text. This would be useful for Moquette-style transitions – here’s an example of a screen blackout between sections.

A player’s progress is saved automatically to the browser’s local storage. They can close their browser tab, and the game will be restored immediately when they come back.

You can save state in attributes, replace text, and make links that replace themselves.

For publishing your game, you can upload it to any web space, or submit it to textadventures.co.uk. You could install PhoneGap or upload it to PhoneGap Build to turn it into an app.

Instead of “big bang” releases, the plan is to improve Squiffy one feature at a time. We will build up to a web-based editor over a series of what will hopefully be relatively frequent releases. For the plan, see the Development Roadmap.

For full details on using Squiffy, see the documentation.

I hope you will give it a try and give me your feedback in the forums!

Quest is now on GitHub

Ever since Quest was made open source back in 2010, we’ve been using CodePlex, which is Microsoft’s open source project hosting site.

Now in 2014, even Microsoft isn’t using CodePlex any more – all their open source ASP.NET is on GitHub, for example.

So CodePlex has been feeling a bit dead, but even worse, it’s been a bit buggy over the last few months – frequently giving me authorisation errors when pushing to the Mercurial repository.

I’d stuck with CodePlex and Mercurial for a while because Git tooling on Windows was always kind of horrible. Fortunately, that changed when GitHub launched GitHub for Windows, which finally makes it easy for just about anybody to use Git.

So I’ve now migrated Quest over, and the source code now officially lives on GitHub at https://github.com/textadventures/quest.

All issues from the CodePlex Issue Tracker have been migrated too. Please log all bug reports at GitHub from now on.

Finally, nobody had ever heard of the Ms-PL which Quest was previously licensed under. I kept having to say it was “just like the MIT licence”. So I’ve updated that too, and Quest is now officially licensed using the MIT licence. Nothing has really changed – you can still do pretty much what you want with the Quest code, including using it within closed-source projects – but hopefully it’s just a bit clearer now.